Ages in Chaos

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John J. More recently Emmet Sweeney, an adept of Velikovsky, [1] Amazon. These generally accept the synchronisms and character identifications proposed by Velikovsky in Ages in Chaos. But he differs from Velikovsky in bringing all of these characters down into the seventh century BC, to be in line with stratigraphic evidence presented by Gunnar Heinsohn.

AGES IN CHAOS by Immanuel Velikovsky | Kirkus Reviews

For Sweeney, therefore, the Mitanni, who corresponded with the pharaohs of the Eighteenth Dynasty, are one and the same as the Medes, conquerors of the Assyrian Empire. Menu Home Articles Images About. Ages in Chaos cover. Proposals Velikovsky claimed in this book that the histories of Ancient Egypt and Ancient Israel are five centuries out of step.

The Ipuwer Papyrus was conventionally dated to approximately years before the conventional date of the Exodus BCE. The concept of alter egos : historical figures who were known by different names in two different sources e. Instead, the 22nd through 25th dynasties follow upon the earlier part of the 18th, leading down to the Assyrian invasions of the early 7th century BCE.

Identify each of the major 19th dynasty pharaohs with a corresponding pharaoh of the 26th. The 20th dynasty here becomes identified with the dynasties which ruled a newly independent Egypt in the early 4th century BCE, and the Sea Peoples against whom Rameses III fought are now identified as the Greek mercenaries of the Persian Kings who are here identified with detailed justification as the Peleset, normally seen as another name for the Philistines. Egyptian and Greek and were conventionally considered to be entirely different people living in different centuries, but who he proposed to be actually erroneously dated accounts of the same individuals and events.

Velikovsky's work has been harshly criticised, including by fellow chronological revisionists such as Peter James.

Ages in Chaos: James Hutton and the Discovery of Deep Time – By Stephen Baxter

In fringe science expert Henry H. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages.


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Published December 12th by Buccaneer Books first published More Details Original Title. Ages in Chaos 1. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Ages in Chaos , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters.

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Sort order. Jan 02, Joy rated it it was amazing. Historians haven't been able to find an account of the Exodus in Egyptian records.


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That's because they were looking in the wrong time period. Currently, the majority guess places it in the time of Ramses II, a strong, stable society unlikely to allow the escape of a horde of slaves. There is an existing description of the Plagues, however, by an Egyptian eyewitness. The Ipuwer Papyrus describes the same plagues as the Bible does. Ipuwer wrote his account at the end of the Middle Kingdom, a time w Historians haven't been able to find an account of the Exodus in Egyptian records.

Ipuwer wrote his account at the end of the Middle Kingdom, a time which included the death of their pharaoh by drowning, followed by their conquest by the Hyksos and the Egyptian Dark Ages. The difference in time between this point and the currently popular guess is about six centuries. By the time Egypt has surviving written records again, it is possible to lay those records alongside the Palestinian-Syrian histories, shift them six centuries, and match up the wars, diplomacy, and cultural styles. No one has been able to do more than guess at who was the King of Punt visited by Pharaoh Hatshepsut.

No one has been able to more than guess at who was the Queen of Sheba who visited King Solomon. That's because they seemed to be six centuries apart. The records of these two visits show the same events and the same gifts exchanged. The el-Amarna letters, a cache of diplomatic correspondence found in Ahknaton's abandoned capitol, describe events in Syria-Palestine that no one had been able to match up.

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Shift them six centuries, and they match the events described in the Books of Kings and Chronicles, the Mesha Stele of Moab, and Assyrian records. Funerary styles and styles of jewelry disappear for six centuries and then reappear in another place. Styles of written records do the same.

Based on those written record styles, philologists were forced to theorize an entire people whose existence couldn't be found by archaeologists. The culprit in all this is Egyptian star dating. Velikovsky, a genius on the level of Einstein — in fact, the two were friends — added an appendix to his final book of historical revision, exposing the guesswork on which Egyptian star dating was based.

With all those lovely star maps on the walls they found, Egyptologists just had to use them, so they took a stab at an unidentifiable proper name and stated firmly that this guessed identification had to be the time that matched the maps. The resulting wild stretches of explanation become unnecessary when star dating is tossed out and the normal comparisons of culture and historical events are used.

View all 4 comments. Jan 19, Reed rated it really liked it. For years scholars have said that the Old Testament is myth because they cannot find any corroborating evidence for the calamities of Moses' Egypt in the Egyptian sources. As a mater of fact they can't find contemporary corroboration for very much of the Old Testament. Now comes Velikovsky who says that the traditional chronology of the OT is off by years, with this adjustment everything fits nicely.

The Ages of Chaos

I loved this book because it adds context to the scriptures from contemporary sources, makin For years scholars have said that the Old Testament is myth because they cannot find any corroborating evidence for the calamities of Moses' Egypt in the Egyptian sources. I loved this book because it adds context to the scriptures from contemporary sources, making the OT much more understandable and enjoyable. Questions about what the OT world was like, who was the Queen of Sheba, what did the plagues of Moses do to the Egyptian Empire are just a few of the subjects covered.

I immediately picked up the sequel, Worlds in Collision, which explains how the Planet Venus burst into our galaxy at the time of Moses and caused the Nile to turn to blood. Veikovsky is as comfortable with Astronomy as he is with Egyptology. He is one of the most brilliant writers I have read.

These books are controversial because all of the traditional historians are protecting their old tortured research which never made sense anyway. I hold back the coveted fifth star from my rating only because this is very deep material and not everyone will enjoy it to the degree that I did. Nov 02, Stephen Tuck rated it it was ok. I read Immanuel Velikovsky's Ages in Chaos on and off for a month or two.

It's heavy going, and I wasn't encouraged to persevere by Velikovsky's reputation as a fringe theorist among fringe theorists. Eventually I said 'sod it' and decided to flip through the bits on Akhenaten which genuinely does interest me and call it a day. It's probably enough to say that this book really isn't worth your time. The basic argument is that somehow I didn't pick up how the accepted chronology of ancient Eg I read Immanuel Velikovsky's Ages in Chaos on and off for a month or two.

The basic argument is that somehow I didn't pick up how the accepted chronology of ancient Egypt includes a non-existent year period. This is why the histories of Egypt and of the Jewish people don't match up. I had a hard time following how Velikovsky was making this point, although that may reflect the stop-start way I read it. He certainly seemed to follow the approach of most fringe theorists Erich von Daniken and Gavin Menzies are also offenders of declaring that because a piece of evidence might conceivably demonstrate such-and-such, it proves such-and-such.

It's not helped by Velikovsky's nondescript prose style which does nothing to hold the reader's interest. If it were half the length and tightly written it would be a diverting argument, but as it stands it's really a book for experts in ancient near-Eastern history, and experts in ancient near-Eastern history have uniformly said it's drivel. View 1 comment. I have settle on 4 stars for this book as well as Worlds in Collision based on enjoyment value. This book recosiders time lines for ancient history in the near east Ancient Egypt and Israel.

The idea is that accepted time lines are out of step and the events recorded did happen but earlier. This book like Velikovaky's first work received less than enthusiastic reviews form the acidemic community. Still it's a good and enjoyable read whatever you may think of it.

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Dec 26, John rated it really liked it. I would highly recommend this book to anyone with a background in Ancient Near Eastern history who enjoys reading an opposing viewpoint. While few will be convinced by Velikovsky's highly controversial theories, that shouldn't prevent one from finding this book ingenious, thought-provoking, and thus a great deal of fun! Shelves: history. Reconstructing Egyptian and Biblical history 13 April When I first heard of Immanuel Velikovsky it was suggested that he was a nutter, however a cursory glance across the Goodreads community actually suggest that there is some acceptance of his theories and I would be one of them, if we restrict ourselves to this book.

I wasn't really sure why people referred to him as a nutter until I discovered that another of his books, Worlds in Collision involved a theory that Venus was originally a m Reconstructing Egyptian and Biblical history 13 April When I first heard of Immanuel Velikovsky it was suggested that he was a nutter, however a cursory glance across the Goodreads community actually suggest that there is some acceptance of his theories and I would be one of them, if we restrict ourselves to this book.

I wasn't really sure why people referred to him as a nutter until I discovered that another of his books, Worlds in Collision involved a theory that Venus was originally a moon of Jupiter that was ejected from its orbit and as it passed by Earth there was a worldwide catastrophe. Now, I have not read that book so I cannot tell what his research is like, or what evidence that he relies upon to support that hypothesis, but I must admit that the evidence that he uses to support his arguments that the Biblical and the Egyptian timelines that we currently use are out of sync by a period of about years is quite sound.

The problem with ancient history is that our reconstruction of it requires an immense amount of guess work, and the further back in history that we go, the foggier it becomes. This is because the amount of literature that has come down to us from that period becomes much less. Personally I feel that our acceptance of the current timelines of Egyptian history are not based on any really solid foundation, and in many cases we are using assumption and simply forcing pieces of evidence together the way one would force pieces of a jigsaw puzzle together if they do not fit.

As with the jigsaw puzzle, the resulting picture is an inconclusive jumble of rubbish that in the end does not make sense - which also ends up creating further excuses to reject the Bible as a legitimate historical text. Velikovsky is not the only scholar who dares to question the accepted history with regards to the Biblical and the Egyptian history, as David Rohl also goes down that path with his book, though I will not necessarily discuss this here as I also intend to write a commentary on that book.

However I feel that the problem that Velikovsky faced is not so much the research that formed the foundations of this book, but rather his other book, World's in Collision, which I suspect that many in the scientific and scholarly community found hard to swallow. Yet when one goes into the world of accepted scholarship one tends to encounter a group of people who are so set in their ways that any major change to any accepted theory is met with huge amounts of resistance.