Last in the Tin Bath: The Autobiography

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The South African-born writer, whose interviews in The Guardian newspaper are always worth reading, collaborated with former Liverpool and England captain Steven Gerrard on his autobiography, My Story.

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The book is notable for some frank opinions on colleagues and opponents, referees and managers, but also for Gerrard's ability to look inside himself and describe how he was affected by the ups and downs of his career. After completing the book, published after the player said his farewells to Liverpool before moving to conclude his career in America, McRae commented: "Gerrard leads us through every exhilarating high and bruising low of his 27 years at Liverpool.

Bumble's Favourite Cricketers - from 'Last in the Tin Bath'

It is a career full of contrast and drama. While English football has turned itself inside out, undergoing enormous upheaval, often fuelled by greed and selfishness, Gerrard has stayed constant. Morgan Author Timebends Arthur Miller Author Dangerous Odds Marisa Lankester Author Napkin Notes W. Garth Callaghan Author W. Garth Callaghan Narrator Almost President Scott Farris Author I'll Always Have Paris!

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Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 09, Ian rated it it was ok. I don't read many sporting biographies but this one got a good plug on TMS and Bumble is quite amusing on air as well as being a fellow Lancastrian so I bought it for the Kindle. This is as bad an example of the genre as I have ever read.


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There is no discernible narrative thread and a dearth of anecdotes that rise above the level of "Meh". There is a lot of self-serving stuff about why being England coach was so hard in his day that nobody could have done any better. This may even be true I don't read many sporting biographies but this one got a good plug on TMS and Bumble is quite amusing on air as well as being a fellow Lancastrian so I bought it for the Kindle.

This may even be true but its reads like a large consignment of sour grapes. And something I didn't know - Lloyd went on one of the mercenary unofficial South African tours in the s when most of the sporting world was doing what it could to chip away at the evil that was apartheid. I would have been interested to hear how he justified that, either to himself or to the many black and brown cricketers with whom he came into contact over the years.

No point being interested though because it was glossed over in a single sentence. This is such a bad book that while reading it I at least gave him credit for writing it himself - surely no professional writer could have produced such dross? But no. There was a ghost, one Richard Gibson.

He too should hang his head in shame. Dec 31, Huw Rhys rated it it was ok.

Biography & Autobiography

When I was given this book as a present, by a fellow sports fan, I was very excited. David "Bumble" Lloyd is one of those extremely likeable characters, mainly because he sort of lives up to his nickname - he bumbles along through life without causing anyone any offence - even though you get the sense sometimes that he's trying hard to break this Mr Nice guy image. But at the end of the day, he's just too nice to do so - and that sums up this book really.

It's just too nice.

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This is meant to be his When I was given this book as a present, by a fellow sports fan, I was very excited. This is meant to be his autobiography, though having started to read it, I realized that I'd read a lot of his life story in a previous book. So is this a second installment of his autobiography, an updated version of his autobiography, or was one of the two life stories I've read by him not in fact an autobiography?

It doesn't matter in the bigger scheme of things - he wouldn't be the first person to write the same story under more than one title after all, would he? But even though it may be the second telling of the same story, it suffers really because sadly there's just not much of a story to tell here. He was bought up, he became a professional cricketer, he tried his hand at umpiring, at coaching and a few other odd jobs, and eventually ended up as a chap who appears on radio and television and makes the odd funny remark, and is known more for his malapropismatic tendencies than his cutting wit, his deep homolifics or his searing intellect.

He is at best ambiguous about his part in one of the most horrible of chapters of Apartheidt South Africa's sporting hall of shame. Time and again, he shows what is either an alarming lack of self awareness - or a deliberate obfuscation of the facts. Towards the end of the book, specifically in the last two or three chapters, the reader gets the definite sense that something has gone wrong with the typesetting, as paragraphs seem to be appear rather randomly with no apparent link to anything that comes immediately before or afterwards - almost as if a bored sub editor has cut loads of bits out, but hasn't bothered to put some sticking plaster or glue to fill up the narrative gaps left behind.


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  8. Yes, there is the odd vaguely amusing anecdote here, and yes, the rather likeable, bumbling character does shine through from time to time, but overall this is at best a rather tepid tin bath of a book I'd been meaning to read this book for a while and it was as enjoyable as I expected it to be. David Lloyd is a naturally funny man as anyone who watches Test Cricket on Sky will know and his humour features heavily through the book. We start with him growing up in Accrington, dressed as a girl because his mother wanted to have a girl called Gwyneth while his dad had a bird called Joey perched on his head most of the time and looked like Mikhail Gorbachev when it took a crap on him!

    He talks abou I'd been meaning to read this book for a while and it was as enjoyable as I expected it to be. He talks about the various jobs he had and the big decision over whether to play football or cricket professionally, and it charts his rise through the Lancashire leagues to play for his county and country.

    We get detail on his England career as a player including his infamous injury and his coaching career for the national side. It was entertaining and fun to read. Dec 04, Steve Parcell rated it did not like it Shelves: uk-history , autobiography. I feel really guilty for marking this book so low as David "Bumble" Lloyd is one of the funniest sports commentators in the UK. However the book sadly does not portray this.

    It is dull, repetitive, monotonous and poorly constructed. One to avoid I am afraid. David Lloyd, aka Bumble, is one of life's energy enhancers. Positivity oozes out of every pore and his enthusiasm for cricket, sport and life is infectious. His autobiography is an often humorous canter through the people, places and events that have made him the man he is today. From humble beginnings in Accrington to the top of English cricket, he has never forgotten his roots nor his belief in the importance of community.

    When you listen to him commentate on TV, you get the feeling that this David Lloyd, aka Bumble, is one of life's energy enhancers. When you listen to him commentate on TV, you get the feeling that this is an approachable man that you would happily spend time with over a pint. This book confirms that view.

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    We need more David Lloyds in the world. Life enhancers who make you feel lifted from just hearing them talk or from being in their company. I thoroughly enjoyed his book and heartily recommend it.